Inicio » ACADEMICOS » Impact of Social Sciences: maximizing the impact of academic research

Impact of Social Sciences: maximizing the impact of academic research

Archivo Publicaciones


(1) Impact of Social Sciences: maximizing the impact of academic research.

As scholars undertake a great migration to online publishing, altmetrics stands to provide an academic measurement of twitter and other online activity

Share

The internet seems to have transformed all industries except one: scholarly communication. Jason Priem has studied academics’ use of Twitter and charts terrific interest among academics in the social media tool as an aid to discuss literature, for teaching and to enrich conferences among his results.

In 1990, Tim Berners-Lee created the Web as a tool for scholarly communication at CERN. In the two decades since, his creation has gone on to transform practically every enterprise imaginable, except somehow, scholarly communication.  Here, instead, we lurch ponderously through the time-sanctified dance of dissemination, 17th-century style. The article reigns. Scholars continue to wad the vibrant, diverse results of their creativity and expertise – figures, datasets, programs, abstracts, annotations, claims, reviews, comments, collections, workflows, discussions, arguments and programs – into publishers’ slow moulds to be cast into articles: static, leaden information ingots.

Growing numbers of scholars, though, are realizing that this approach is no longer the best we can do. We’re defrosting our digital libraries, moving over a million personal reference collections online to services like Zotero and Mendeley (and in the process making the open reference list a new kind of publication). Scholars are flocking to scholarly blogs to post ideas, collaborate with colleagues, anddiscuss literature, often creating a sort of peer-review after publication. Emboldened by national mandates and notable successes, we’re beginning to publish reusable datasets as first-class citizens in the scholarly conversation. We’re sharing our software as publications and on the Web. The journal was the first revolution in scholarly communication; we’re on the brink of a second, driven by the new diversity, speed, and accessibility of the Web.

The poster child for this Scholcomm Spring is Twitter. There’s been terrific interest in scholars using Twitter to discuss and cite literature, for teaching, to enrich conferences, or less formally as a “global faculty lounge.” We recently finished a large study to get better data on these uses.

Instead of asking for self-identified scholars on Twitter, we started out with a list of around 9,000 scholars from five US and UK universities and searched for their names on the Twitter API. After manually confirming all the matches, we downloaded all the tweets each scholar had made and coded the content of these. The graphic below has some details of our findings, but here’s a summary:

  1. Twitter adoption is broad-based: scholars from different fields and career stages are taking to Twitter at about the same rate.
  2. Scholars are using Twitter as a scholarly medium, making announcements, linking to articles, even engaging in discussions about methods and literature. But the majority of most scholars’ tweets are personal, underscoring Twitter as a space of context collapse, where users manage multiple identities.
  3. Only about 1 in 40 scholars has an actively-updated Twitter account. This may seem small, but keep in mind that Twitter is only 5 years old; email was still a scholarly novelty 15 years after its creation. Taking the long view, the current count of scholars using Twitter is probably less important than its continued growth, which we see clearly.

Click the image to enlarge.

Results like these are encouraging for those of us who see social media and related environments as the natural next frontier for communicating scholarship. It seems that scholars, without waiting for approval from the mandarins of the publishing industry, are beginning to explore and colonize the Web’s wide-open spaces.

But perhaps the most exciting thing about this nascent scholarly great migration is that the new, online tools of scholarship begin to give public substance to the formally ephemeral roots of scholarship: the discussions never transcribed, the annotations never shared, the introductions never acknowledged, the manuscripts saved and reread but never cited. These backstage activities are now increasingly tagged, catalogued, and archived on blogs, Mendeley, Twitter, and elsewhere.

As more scholars move more of their workflows to the public Web, we are assembling a vast registry of intellectual transactions – a web of ideas and their uses whose timeliness, speed, and precision make the traditional citation network look primitive.

I’ve been involved in early efforts to understand and use these new data sources to inform alternative metrics of impact, or “altmetrics.” Altmetrics could be used in evaluating scholars or institutions, complementing unidimensional citation counts with a rich array of indicators revealing diverse impacts on multiple populations. They could also inform new, real-time filters for scholars burdened by information overload: imagine a system that gathers and analyses the bookmarks, pageviews, tweets, and blog posts from your online networks, using your interactions with them to learn and display each day’s most important articles or posts.

Even better, what if every scholar in the world had such a system? We might do away with journals entirely. The Web can disseminate and archive products for almost nothing. The slow, back-room machinations of closed peer review could be replaced by an open, accountable, distributed system that simply listens in to expert communities’ natural reactions to new work – the same way Google efficiently ranks the Web by listening in to the crowdsourced ‘review’ of the hyperlink network.

Of course, this particular vision may not pan out. And although the current signs point toward more growth, scholars might get tired of Twitter. But to hang our hopes on a particular vision or tool is to miss what’s truly revolutionary about this moment. The journal monoculture, long the only viable approach to scholarly communication, is beginning to yield at its fringes to a more diverse, vibrant, online ecosystem of scholarly expression. This new ecosystem promises to change not only the way we express scholarship, but the way we measure, assess, and consume it.

 

Impact of Social Sciences: maximizing the impact of academic research

 The internet seems to have transformed all industries except one: scholarly communication. Jason Priem has studied academics’ use of Twitter and charts terrific interest among academics in the social media tool as an aid to discuss literature, for teaching and to enrich conferences among his results.http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2011/11/21/altmetrics-twitter/

TRADUCCIÓN DE GOOGLE

Como los académicos realizan una gran migración a la publicación en línea, altmetrics  proporciona una medición académica de twitter y otras actividades en línea

 


El Internet parece haber transformado todos los sectores, excepto una:. Comunicación académica 

Jason Priem ha estudiado el uso de los académicos de Twitter y gráficos increíble interés entre los académicos de la herramienta de medios sociales como una ayuda para hablar de literatura, para la enseñanza y enriquecer conferencias entre sus resultados .

En 1990, Tim Berners-Lee creó la Web como una herramienta para la comunicación científica en el CERNEn las dos décadas siguientes, su creación ha llegado a transformar prácticamente todas las empresas imaginables, excepto de alguna manera, la comunicación académica. El artículo reina. Los estudiosos siguen taco los vibrantes y diversos resultados de su creatividad y experiencia – figuras, conjuntos de datos, programas, resúmenes, anotaciones, reclamaciones, comentarios, colecciones, flujos de trabajo, debates, discusiones y programas – en moldes lentos editores, ser echado al Artículos:, lingotes de plomo de información estática.

Un número creciente de estudiosos, sin embargo, se están dando cuenta de que este enfoque ya no es lo mejor que podemos hacer. Estamos descongelación de las bibliotecas digitales , moviendo más de un millón de colecciones de referencias personales en línea a servicios como Zotero y Mendeley (y en la toma de la lista de referencia abierto un nuevo tipo de publicación). Los estudiosos están acudiendo en masa a los blogs académicos para publicar las ideas, colaborar con colegas y hablar de literatura , creando a menudo una especie de revisión de pares después de su publicación . Envalentonado pormandatos nacionales y éxitos notables , estamos empezando a publicar conjuntos de datos reutilizables como ciudadanos de primera clase en la conversación académica. Estamos compartiendo nuestro software como publicaciones y en la Web . La revista fue la primera revolución en la comunicación académica, estamos al borde de un segundo, impulsado por la nueva diversidad, velocidad y accesibilidad de la Web.

 Twitter. Ha habido increíble interés por los estudiosos que utilizan Twitter para discutir y citar la literatura , para la enseñanza , para enriquecer conferencias o menos formalmente como un ” salón mundial del profesorado . “Hemos terminado recientemente un estudio a gran escala para obtener mejores datos sobre estos usos.

En lugar de pedir auto-identificados eruditos en Twitter, comenzamos con una lista de alrededor de 9.000 investigadores de cinco universidades de Estados Unidos y Reino Unido y búsquedas de sus nombres en la API de Twitter. Después de confirmar manualmente todos los partidos, hemos descargado todos los tweets cada estudioso había hecho y codificado el contenido de estos. El gráfico a continuación tiene algunos detalles de nuestras conclusiones, pero aquí está un resumen:

  1. La Adopción Twitter es amplia: los estudiosos de diferentes ámbitos y etapas de carrera están llevando a Twitter o menos a la misma velocidad.
  2. Los estudiosos están utilizando Twitter como un medio académico, hacer anuncios, enlaces a artículos, incluso la participación en las discusiones acerca de los métodos y de la literatura. Pero la mayoría de los tweets más eruditos son personales, lo que subraya Twitter como un espacio decolapso contexto , donde los usuarios gestionar múltiples identidades.
  3. Sólo 1 de cada 40 expertos tiene una cuenta de Twitter activa actualizada. Esto puede parecer pequeña, pero tenga en cuenta que Twitter tiene sólo 5 años de edad, correo electrónico era todavía una novedad académica 15 años después de su creación . Tomando la visión a largo plazo , la cuenta corriente de estudiosos que utilizan Twitter es probablemente menos importante que su continuo crecimiento, que se ve claramente.

Haga clic en la imagen para ampliar.

Resultados como éstos son alentadores para aquellos de nosotros que ven los medios sociales y entornos relacionados como la próxima frontera natural para comunicar beca. Parece que los académicos, sin esperar a la aprobación de los mandarines de la industria editorial, están empezando a explorar y colonizar los espacios abiertos de la Web.

Pero quizás lo más interesante de este naciente gran migración académica es que las nuevas herramientas en línea de becas comienzan a dar contenido público a las raíces formalmente efímeras de becas: las discusiones no transcritas, las anotaciones no compartidas, las presentaciones nunca reconocieron la manuscritos guardar y volver a leer, pero nunca citan. Estos bastidores actividades están cada vez etiquetados, catalogados y archivados en los blogs, Mendeley, Twitter, y otros lugares.

A medida que más investigadores se mueven más de sus flujos de trabajo para la Web pública, estamos armando un gran registro de transacciones intelectual – una red de ideas y sus usos cuya puntualidad, velocidad y precisión que la red tradicional de citas mirada primitiva.

He estado involucrado en los primeros esfuerzos para comprender y utilizar estas nuevas fuentes de datos para informar las métricas alternativas de impacto, o ” altmetrics . “Altmetrics podría ser utilizada en la evaluación de los académicos o instituciones, complementando unidimensionales cita cuenta con una rica variedad de indicadores que revela diversos impactos en múltiples poblaciones. También pueden informar a los nuevos filtros y en tiempo real para los estudiosos agobiados por el exceso de información: imaginar un sistema que recoge y analiza los marcadores, páginas vistas, tweets y blogs de sus redes en línea, mediante sus interacciones con ellos para aprender y mostrar cada día de artículos o entradas más importantes.

Mejor aún, ¿y si todos los eruditos en el mundo tenía tal sistema? Podríamos acabar con las revistas del todo. La Web puede difundir y productos de archivo para casi nada. El lento y maquinaciones de revisión por pares cerrado trastienda podría ser sustituido por un sistema de rendición de cuentas abiertas, distribuido que simplemente escucha en las reacciones naturales comunidades de expertos “a un nuevo trabajo – de la misma manera Google ocupa eficazmente la Web escuchando en el crowdsourcing “revisión” de la red de enlace.

Por supuesto, esta visión particular no puede ser un éxito. Y a pesar de los signos actuales apuntan hacia un mayor crecimiento, los estudiosos pudieron conseguir cansados ​​de Twitter. Pero para colgar nuestras esperanzas en una visión o herramienta en particular es no ver lo que es realmente revolucionario en este momento. El monocultivo diario, durante mucho tiempo el único enfoque viable para la comunicación académica, empieza a producir en sus márgenes a una más diversa, vibrante ecosistema de expresión en línea académica. Este nuevo ecosistema promete cambiar no sólo la forma en que expresamos beca, pero la forma de medir, evaluar y consumirlo.

Anuncios

2 comentarios

  1. Keven Barton dice:

    Of course, this particular vision may not pan out. And although the current signs point toward more growth, scholars might get tired of Twitter. But to hang our hopes on a particular vision or tool is to miss what’s truly revolutionary about this moment. The journal monoculture, long the only viable approach to scholarly communication, is beginning to yield at its fringes to a more diverse, vibrant, online ecosystem of scholarly expression. This new ecosystem promises to change not only the way we express scholarship, but the way we measure, assess, and consume it.

    Me gusta

  2. […] Impact of Social Sciences: maximizing the impact of academic research […]

    Me gusta

Los comentarios están cerrados.

A %d blogueros les gusta esto: